The Effects of Sun on The Eyes

Hot weather, stronger sun, sun bathing, swimming pools, air conditioning and dry atmospheres are all factors that can adversely affect the eye and cause vision problems.

The summer is a time when we really do want to look our best as we look forward to a holiday in the sun or weekends away. It is at times like this that we are more likely to meet new faces and make new friends so watery, bloodshot eyes must be avoided if possible.

UV Radiation from the sun can trigger the onset of cataracts. It is a common misconception that cataracts are solely age related. This is not so. Cataracts can occur at any age. Sunlight reflected from the surface of water or other reflective medium can cause conjunctivitis and keratitis.

The principle symptoms of conjunctivitis, sometimes known as pinkeye, are an intense itchiness and gritty feeling in the eye with accompanying redness, watery discharge and runny nose.

Keratitis is a term used to define a wide variety of painful corneal infections, irritations and inflammations and it is important to obtain medical diagnosis and treatment at the earliest opportunity as delay can lead to corneal scarring which has vision implications.

Other causes of conjunctivitis and keratitis are lack of hygiene. In hot summer weather bugs of all sorts multiply faster so keep clean and in particular wash hands frequently.

Take these simple precautions seriously during the summer and you will limit the possibility of suffering from unsightly eyes and help to prevent the onset of sun related vision problems.

Avoid looking towards the sun, the solar rays can cause complete and at any age. permanent loss of sight. Wear sunglasses with good quality lenses. The lenses are the most important so do not be tempted to buy sunglasses just because the design is fashionable and suits you – check out the lenses.

The better lens colors are brown grey or green and preferably avoid very dark and very light colored lenses.

Air Conditioning:  avoid continuous exposure to vents, as this will cause the surface of the eye to dry out.

To keep the eyes clear, sparkling and healthy it is essential that the surface stays naturally irrigated at all times.

If your eyes begin to feel dry blink rapidly a few times and this should help regulate the natural moisturizing effect.

Blinking is good in chlorinated swimming pools. It is best to always use goggles when swimming in a pool, as chlorine is an irritant that affects the eyes and too much exposure can be a cause of conjunctivitis or keratitis.

Even if you don't immerse your head under the water, chlorine fumes are above the surface and will cause eye redness after a time and we do want to look our best don't we?

Dust particles and pollen are a hazard of the summer months and can provoke or accentuate allergies that, sadly, in virtually every case have an effect on the eyes.

Try close fitting wrap around sunglasses to keep as much of the dust and pollen out and don't forget to check the lenses for quality. Controlling the allergy with medication and keeping the dust out can allow your eyes to retain their natural beauty and prevent ugly redness and watering.

Summer is to enjoy and to get that feel good factor. The best parties and opportunities to meet new people seem to occur in summer. When the sun is out we feel and look healthier.

Summer is a time for optimism. We spend more time out doors, the days are longer, and the flowers are at their best.

This is the time of the year when we are recharging our batteries and our bodies are preparing for the colder and sunless months ahead. Don't let red sore eyes diminish any of the pleasures you can get from summer, be wise and take care of your most precious asset and stay looking good.

Author:

Jaks Lloyd is a former photographic fashion model. She now lives in Spain and indulges her creative talents by writing and building innovative authority websites. http://www.eyebeautytips.com

Photo Credit: imagerymajestic / Freedigitalphotos.net

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com

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