Herbs & Roots for Prosperity

prosperity
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Plants, Herbs, and Roots for Prosperity

Plants of all kinds (including trees), herbs and roots have been used for centuries to draw money to a person or bring prosperity to a home.


There are several ways to use a plant in this manner:

You can carry some of the substance on you.

This can be as easy as putting a tiny bit of the herb in a tiny plastic bag and put in your pocket. An easy way is to put a pinch of the herb into a locket.

Sew a sachet or pouch.

You can buy ready made sachets or pouches that you can use for this purpose, but you can also sew a small one using an appropriately colored material. Green and yellow are popular colors associated with prosperity and money one. These sachets are then tucked under the bed or somewhere in the home, worn on a string around the neck, put in a purse or wallet or concealed somewhere in the home. Some people simply fill a potpourri jar with the appropriate herbs and leave it in a prominent place in the house.

The simplest “Earth, Water, Air, Fire” Ritual is to boil the herb for a while in the water.

The Herbs are the earth, the water is in the pot, the air is the steam and the fire element is the stove. Occasionally stir the herb in the water while thinking of your magical intention. Strain the plant material from the liquid and sprinkle it around or outside the home.

Use them as Incense.

Some plants are hypnotics so I don’t really recommend this unless you are certain that the herb is not toxic once set alight. Traditionally though, herbs are set alight on charcoal burners and the smoke allowed to waft through the house.

Here are some of the more popular herbs used to draw prosperity and money. Most are available in your garden or from stores, but there are occult shops and apothecaries that carry herbs in jars:

Alfalfa – Known traditionally as the “good luck” herb I recommend tucking a sprig of this in your purse or in a locket. When combined with other money drawing herbs in a sachet it is thought to reinforce the other substance’s powers.

Allspice – Can be carried on the person or burned as incense or sprinkled in the four corners of the house. It is thought to attract business luck or success.

Bayberry – Bayberry can be bought commercially as a candle –“A bayberry candle burned to the socket – brings luck to the home and puts money in the pocket.” It can also be bought as incense.

Basil – Soaking basil leaves in water for three days and then sprinkling the water at your business premises is thought to attract financial success. The leaves can also be carried with you.

Bay Leaves – Bay leaves increase intuition and are good if you are looking for a promotion or a job. Tuck some under your mattress or boil them and sprinkle the water around your home. Hallucinogenic so I do not recommend you burn these.

Chamomile – Washing your hands in chamomile tea is thought to bring gamblers luck. Drinking the tea is thought to bring luck and prosperity.

Cloves – Cloves can be burned on charcoal, tucked in a sachet or put in your purse to draw money. An ancient money and protection ritual is to stick an orange with the heads of cloves stuck on pins and hang it on a ribbon in the kitchen so your cupboards are never bare.

Cinnamon: A very handy kitchen spice that can be used “in a pinch” to bring quick money, it can be bought as incense or burned on charcoal or sprinkled in a cash register or wallet to bring business.

Citronella: The leaves are thought to be good for attracting business and also smell lovely in a potpourri. Citronella is, however, toxic to birds – so avoid burning it in the house if you have feathered friends in your menagerie.

Five-Finger Grass (also known as Cinquefoil): This lemony grass can be burned, hid in a potpourri or carried on your person. It is the standard ingredient in most money drawing incenses.

Grains of Paradise: These little round seeds are carried in the purse or wallet or tucked in a sachet under the pillow to bring luck and guidance in career or money matters.

Honeysuckle: The live and dried flowers are used to attract luck business and prosperity.

Irish Moss: This is seaweed that can be bought in Caribbean stores. It is traditionally used to make a sweet drink. It is also carried in sachets to bring money to the bearer.

Juniper Berries: Associated with Jupiter, the berries of the juniper tree are said to attract luck, good fortune and business success.

Mint: All the mints (spearmint, peppermint) are used to attract good spirits and speed good fortune to the bearer.

Patchouli: Added to prosperity herb mixes to reinforce the manifestation power of your wishes. Can be bought as an incense, it has a commanding component to it.

Strawberry Leaves: Carried on the person and used to draw fortunate circumstances into a person’s life.

Squill Root: If you can find this, it is said to be one of the most powerful roots used to draw money to the bearer.

Tonka Beans: Tonkas are large dried beans that protect against poverty and that are just considered plain lucky. Place a bean in your purse, near your computer or under your phone – anywhere where you need luck in business. Avoid burning these.

The Author:

Sam Steven’s metaphysical articles have been published in many high-standing newspapers and she has published several books. You can meet Sam Stevens at http://www.psychicrealm.com where she works as a professional psychic. You can also read more of her articles at http://www.newagenotebook.com where she is the staff writer. Currently she is studying technology’s impact on the metaphysics.


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2 Responses to Herbs & Roots for Prosperity

  1. Fee says:

    I have been looking for this break down I am so happy

  2. Ana says:

    good stuff

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